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Momoyam Kachinas Women


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Momoyam Kachina

Women Katsina Masks

katsinmana-sakwats-manaKachina types may cross match into one or more group since many kachinas are multi-faceted with numerous responsibilities and roles. Momoyam Kachinas and Kachinmana (kachina girls) are spirit beings who watch over women, mothers and sisters. Kachina women are social dancers and members of Marau and Qagöl women's societies and like all kachinas are endowed with human characteristics.

Female Kachinas

Female kachinas generally wear belts tied to the side of their waists and often carry food, water and gifts to bestow on the villagers. Some female kachinas carry weapons such as bows, knives, saws and yucca whips such as the Soyok Wuhti, ogre kachina. Kachinmana can be distinguished bt their hair dressed in large whorls which was the hair style of unmarried girls.

Mana or Momoyam kachinas impersonators are all men or boys with the rare exception of the Pachavuin Mana. There is no negative social stigma attached to any man or boy who is selected to impersonate a female kachina or personality. When a female kachina accompanyies a male kachina she will always assume the name of that particular kachina.

Printable Women kachina style paper masks for young children to print, cut out with scissors, color, and decorate with crayons, markers, glitter, feathers, yarn, colorful papers and fabrics. Decorate your masks with preshaped cut and paste designs.

Momoyam Female Kachinas

Each kachina mask pattern has a brief overview of the Hopi religious and ceremonial meaning and purpose of the design plus links to one or more existing native American kachina doll photo or drawing. Many kachinas can belong to more than one group or category, for example, a chief kachina can also be a clown or a runner, and might be listed in those categories as well. Children can decorate the masks using their own imagination or refer to the the photos of actual native American designs and make the masks come to life with stories and song.

This section contains Women theme Kachina mask color book templates ready for color book fun, complete with hair, feathers and other mask decorations.

Ha hai-i Wuhti Hahay’iwuuti or Kachina Mother

hahai-i-wu-utiThe Hahai-I Wuhti or Grand Mother Kachina is known as the mother of all kachinas, mother of monsters and other kachinas, plus the mother of dogs. Other names for the Hahai-I Wuhti are Pour Water Woman and Mother Earth. Her real children are the Nata'aska (uncle of the family of ogre Katsinas) and monsters.

Hahai-I Wuhti is believed to be Chief Eototo's wife and portrayed as a supporting influence to Eototo's kachina impersonation, however, she is also believed to be the dominating and demanding mother to the Nataska Kachinas. She makes her appearances in important ceremonies such as the Hopi Shalako, the Water Serpent, the Soyoko and the Powamu. Some ceremonies have her threatening villagers if she is not fed meat, and in other ceremonies she gives food (somiviki) to children and blesses them with water. Ogre kachinas appear at the Powamuya (bean dance) accompanying Soyok Wuhti to threaten children against misbehaving and enforce good behavior among the children.

The kachina is a green case mask with different colored eyes, one purple and the other black. Two hanks of colored yarn is tied across the forehead. The collar or ruff is made of fox skin.

Hoho Mana or Zuni Kachina Maiden

hoho-mana-mask-kachinaHoho Mana Katsina or Zuni Kachina Maiden

Alo Mana

alo-manaMost kachina impersonators or dancers are men, even when the kachina spirit is female. Momoyam or Kachina women represent the wives, mothers, and sisters of the kachinas. Alo Mana kachinas accompany their male counterpart kachinas and assume the name of that particular male kachina during the ceremonies. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category.

The Alo Mana, or White-faced Kachina Girl(s), dance and carry musical instruments and make rhythmic sounds during the ceremonial dances. This kachina has a white half-face mask and a feather beard. There is no English translation of the name Alo Mana. They are very similar in appearance to the Kachin Mana.

Takursh Mana Angak’chin’ Long Hair

angakchina-tewa-long-hairThe Takursh Mana has several different names; Angak'chin', Angak'china, Ma-alo, Pawik'china and other indian names. English names are Long-Haired Kachina and Yellow Girl. This mana kachina is a popular kachina who appears everywhere from the Rio Grande to the Hopi villages on the mesas of Northern Arizona. As Rûgans they appear in groups and perform identical dances while producing rhythmic sounds by playing musical instruments such as resonating gourds and sticks.

This kachina welcomes the spring season with melodious songs and graceful dancing. The Ang-Ak-China arrive in groups accompanied by the Takursh Mana or Angak'chin' (Angaktsin Mana), his female counterpart, and together are responsible for bringing much needed rain to the arid Hopi nation.

The long hair combined with upright feathers on the top are said to represent rising clouds and falling rain.

He-e-e Warrior Maiden

he-e-e-warrior-maidenHe'e'e, He Wuhti, Warrior Woman or Maiden, belongs to both the Guard or Tuwalakum Kachinas and Chief or Mongwi Kachinum categories.

The history behind the story of this kachina depends upon the mesa. Second Mesa says this kachina was a young, half-dressed warrior caught by suprise into battle. Other versions says she was a young half-dressed maiden caught up in a sudden battle. In all versions, however, the person gropped everything and took up weapons to fight off the attackers until help arrived.

Most kachina impersonators or dancers are men, even when the kachina spirit is female. The He'e'e kachina is a very powerful spirit who leads a procession of warrior kachinas to protect the Pachavu ceremonial procession. In some other ceremonies guard kachinas have to protect the ceremony from the He'e'e kachina power.

Masau’u Life and Death Girl

masau-u-earth-godMasau'u Kachin Mana or Death Girl Kachina is a rasping kachina who accompanies the Masau'u Kachina in song by using rasp and gourd musical instruments. She is believed to be a bringer of rain.

Angak'china Tewa

Most kachina impersonators or dancers are men, even when the kachina spirit is female. Momoyam or Kachina women represent the wives, mothers, and sisters of the kachinas. Angak'china Tewa kachinas accompany their male counterpart kachinas and assume the name of that particular male kachina during the ceremonies. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category.

The Angak'china Tewa kachinas dance and carry musical instruments and make rhythmic sounds during the ceremonial dances. This kachina has a white half-face mask and a feather beard. There is no English translation of the name Angak'china Tewa. They are very similar in appearance to the Kachin Mana.

Katsin Mana Corn Maiden also Katsinmana

katsinmana-sakwats-manaKatsin Mana Corn Maiden

Chakwaina Grandmother

chakwaina-grandmotherThe Chakwaina kachina, a wuya of his clan is a warrior kachina who has a number of relatives which include the Grandmother, Mana or Mother and Sister as well as the Uncle, a side dancer. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category.

The Chakwaina Sho-adta and Chakwaina Mana Kachina is the Grandmother of the Asa Clan. Most kachina impersonators or dancers are men, even when the kachina spirit is female. This kachina appears in January during the Kiva Dances in the Pamuya ceremonies at First Mesa.

Like the He'e'e kachina the Chakwaina represents a warrior spirit who leads a band of other warrior kachinas to help protect the ceremonies.

Chakwaina Sho-adta Examples:

Qoia Kachin-mana

qoia-kachin-manaKau-a or Qoia Old Time Navajo

Soyok Whuti Ogre Woman

soyok-whuti-ogre-womanThe So'yoko (Soyok' Wuhti) or Ogre Woman is believed to have come from the Awatovi Ruins in Navajo County, Arizona, a pueblo destroyed in the late 1700's.

She is fearsome in appearance, dressed in black with long straggly hair, buggy eyes and a large fanged mouth. She performs with Soyok'Taka or Ogre Man, another fearsome monster ogre, who stands by her side and stomps his feet and growls. Her cry is a shrill falsetto that sounds like "Soyoko-u-u-u"!

When the Soyok' Wuhti appears the children become petrified with fright. This beastly kachina carries a blood-smeared saw, knife or cleaver in one hand, a scary crook in the other hand and threatens to eat naughty little children. She often reaches out with her crook to grab unwary villagers or children and whenever she catches children she places them in her basket and holds them for ransom.

She is fearsome in appearance, dressed in black with long straggly hair, buggy eyes and a large fanged mouth. Her cry is a shrill falsetto that sounds like "Soyoko-u-u-u"!

Angwusnasomtaka Crow-Mother Tumas

angwusnasomtaka-crow-motherThe Angwusnasomtaka, Tumas, Crow Mother or Man with Crow Wings Tied To, is the mother of the Hu or Whipper kachinas. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category. Many Hopis believe she is the mother of all Kachinas. She appears on all three mesas during the Powamu or Bean Dance. On the third mesa she is called Angwushahai-i, or Crow Bride where she dresses entirely in white. She also talks and sings on the third mesa.

Her responsibility is to give protection and guidance to children while they are at play and during ritual initiations. During initiation, she brings a bunch of Narrowleaf Yucca plant blades, (thin yucca plant leaves) in to the kiva and hands the yucca blades to the Hu Kachinas who strike the children several times with the leaves.

Yucca plants are very important to the Native Americans of Northern Arizona and Utah. They use virtually all of the Yucca plant in various ways including using the narrowleaf yucca's sword-like leaves to make baskets and sandals.